Bishop Andrewes, alluding to it, observes that it is "as the base court to the temple," and adds that a man must do his duty "for fear of punishment, if he cannot get himself to do it for love of righteousness." )Perfect LoveG. John Piper May 26, 1985 933 Shares Sermon. For if I am out of harmony with Him, what will be my fate in the midst of a universe administered by Him, and in which all are His servants? If I go to Jesus Christ as a sinful man, and get His love bestowed upon me, then, as the next verse to my text says, my love springs in response to His to me, and in the measure in which that love rises in my heart will it frustrate its antagonistic dread. That brings me to the second point — viz., THE MISSION OF FEAR. Maclaren, D. D.)A soul-tormenting fear and a fear-expelling loveD. What ought I to do? And yet Scripture assigns to fear a considerable place in the apparatus, so to speak, of religious motives and forces (Luke 12:5; 2 Corinthians 5:10, 11; Philippians 2:12, 13; 1 Peter 1:17). Bright, D. D.The words of St. John as to fear and love would probably startle us if they were less familiar. Oh! D. Fear hath punishmentCambridge Bible for Schools.(R.V. Watson. He has been saying that perfect love produces courage in the day of judgment, because it produces likeness to Christ, who is the judge. "Torment" does not convey the whole idea of the word. (f)The fear of hell.2. Inconsistent as the two emotions are in themselves, in practice, they may be united by reason of the imperfection of the nobler. (Samuel Dunn. A SOUL-TORMENTING FEAR.1. And in the Christian life they are united with terrible frequency. My fear should be to me like the misshapen guide that may lead me to the fortress where I shall be safe. Then there rises up another object of dread, which, in like manner, derives all its power to terrify and to hurt from the fact of our discordance with God, and that is, the "shadow feared of man," that stands shrouded by the path, and waits for each of us. In such passages the underlying purport is obvious: "Do this, avoid that, or it will be the worse for you: obey, on peril of the consequences of disobedience." (e)The fear of the judgment. THE EMPIRE OF FEAR. In general we can see, I think, without difficulty, how the two, love and fear, do exclude one another. This includes —1. It makes the present miserable by its horrid forebodings of the future. We observe the Lord’s Supper the third Sunday of each month, followed by a potluck, and then the afternoon service at 1:30 instead of 2:00. Look at that strange maternal instinct that in the lowest animals — out of weakness makes them strong, and causes them to forget all terror of the most terrible at the bidding of the mighty and conquering affection. Into such a love for God as excludes all fear whatsoever? And so this wholesome, manly dread of the certain issue of discord with God is meant to do for us what the angels did for Lot — lay a mercifully violent hand on the shoulder of the sleeper, and shake him into aroused wakefulness, and hasten him out of Sodom. Then there rises up another object of dread, which, in like manner, derives all its power to terrify and to hurt from the fact of our discordance with God, and that is, the "shadow feared of man," that stands shrouded by the path, and waits for each of us. As St. says, this is not the fear that "is clean" — it arises not out of love of God, but out of the terror of suffering; yet it may make the whole difference to a person's moral future whether, at a particular critical time, he has it, or has it not. Maclaren, D. D.)Love and fearJ. In some respects nearly allied to the other — as where we dread the arrival of a judge who is to try us, and whose sentence must certainly bring after it imprisonment or execution. Into such a love for God as excludes all fear whatsoever? "Torment" does not convey the whole idea of the word. A FEAR-EXPELLING LOVE. Nothing! I fear; then what do I do? And in the Christian life they are united with terrible frequency. If you believe, because of the Spirit working in you, you are filled with God. Where there is perfect love there is true tranquillity, the sweetest harmony: all is peace — perfect, perpetual, eternal peace. THE EMPIRE OF FEAR. He, and He alone, can deal with the disturbing element in my relation to God. This fear must be got rid of. The answer is, that our Lord and St. Peter and St. Paul are urging men to fear the penal consequence of sin, considered in their whole length and breadth, and concentrated into that one supremely terrible, consequence — perpetual exclusion from the presence of God; whereas St. John is looking at "fear" of penal suffering considered in itself — the dread of hell, pure and simple. A Greater Calling // Recharged For A Purpose. )The spirit of fearJames Freeman Clarke. how that should, and if it be right, will, strengthen and brace, and make every man in whom it dwells, frank, fearless, careless of personal consequences! Fear hath punishmentCambridge Bible for Schools.(R.V. There are many professing Christian people who live all their days with a burden of shivering dread upon their shoulders and an icy cold fear in their hearts, just because they have not got close enough to Jesus Christ, and kept their hearts with sufficient steadfastness under the quickening influences of His love, to have shaken off their dread as a sick man's distempered fancies. The answer is, that our Lord and St. Peter and St. Paul are urging men to fear the penal consequence of sin, considered in their whole length and breadth, and concentrated into that one supremely terrible, consequence — perpetual exclusion from the presence of God; whereas St. John is looking at "fear" of penal suffering considered in itself — the dread of hell, pure and simple. Fear, guilt, and shame cannot coexist alongside faith, hope, and love. These movies were fun because you could be afraid for an hour or so, and then it was all over. But now there is something else that casts out fear than perfect love, and that is — perfect levity. And these will, by degrees, absorb the fear of punishment, simply as such — into what? (2) But —(a)Servile fear. As St. says, this is not the fear that "is clean" — it arises not out of love of God, but out of the terror of suffering; yet it may make the whole difference to a person's moral future whether, at a particular critical time, he has it, or has it not. The "dread of something after death" has been felt by most men at some time or other. Every affection makes him who cherishes it, in some degree, braver than he would have been without it. So preach as much as we may the mercy of God, I tell you that men will still fear, will fear death, will fear hell, as long as unreconciled, unrepented sin is in their hearts. Arising from that discomforting consciousness of discord there come, likewise, other forms and objects of dread. The answer is, that our Lord and St. Peter and St. Paul are urging men to fear the penal consequence of sin, considered in their whole length and breadth, and concentrated into that one supremely terrible, consequence — perpetual exclusion from the presence of God; whereas St. John is looking at "fear" of penal suffering considered in itself — the dread of hell, pure and simple. But that humble, filial reverence, which never forgets or slights the distance between the Creator and the creature which exercises itself day by day "to have always a conscience void of offence both toward God and toward man" — this is a Christian grace: if there be yet one higher, it must be sought, not in the abandonment, but in the strengthening of this. Bishop Andrewes, alluding to it, observes that it is "as the base court to the temple," and adds that a man must do his duty "for fear of punishment, if he cannot get himself to do it for love of righteousness." My fear should be to me like the misshapen guide that may lead me to the fortress where I shall be safe. )FearDean Alford.by anticipating punishment has it even now. Into such a love for God as excludes all fear whatsoever? My text points out the natural antagonism and mutual exclusiveness of these two emotions. God is righteous; God righteously administers His universe. And when perfect love is attained, it casts out all fear. The influential dwelling of God within us.4. Horses in a burning stable are so paralysed by dread that they cannot stir, and get burnt to death. In such passages the underlying purport is obvious: "Do this, avoid that, or it will be the worse for you: obey, on peril of the consequences of disobedience." (2) But —(a)Servile fear. What ought I to do? My fear should be to me like the misshapen guide that may lead me to the fortress where I shall be safe. This fear must be got rid of. Current headlines come straight from the pages of Scripture. God; God's universe; God's messenger, Death — these are facts with which we stand in relation, and if our relations with Him are out of gear, then He and all of these are legitimate objects of dread to us. Bright, D. D.The words of St. John as to fear and love would probably startle us if they were less familiar. Distrust is the offspring of suspicion, and want of confidence is want of love. Oh! How does it do this? A little love has not mass enough in it to drive out thick, clustering fears. INTRODUCTION Maclaren, D. D.)A soul-tormenting fear and a fear-expelling loveD. It regards God not as the all holy and all-good Father, who has every right to filial obedience, but as an irresistible Power, not to be trifled with or escaped from, who can and will inflict tremendous penalties on those who venture to defy His authority. Thus delivered from the fear of sin by the power of the gospel, we are also delivered from the fear of God. Fear, the apprehension of personal evil, has the same function in the moral world as pain has in the physical, It is a symptom of disease, and is intended to bid us look for the remedy and the Physician. But what does this verse mean? For there is another way in which love produces boldness, and that is by its casting out fear. Whilst all things serve the soul that serves Him, all are embattled against the man that is against, or not for, God and His will. Shows the philosophy of the gospel.(D. It is not self-reliance that makes the hero. Let the discovery of my own sinfulness direct me to its remedy — the righteousness and the Cross of Jesus Christ. There was no joy in religion and no love. Let the discovery of my own sinfulness direct me to its remedy — the righteousness and the Cross of Jesus Christ. (2)By transforming us into God's image. I believe, for my part, that such a dumb, dim consciousness of discord attaches to all men, though it is often smothered, often ignored, and often denied. The law of God shows us what our duty is, but gives us no power to do it. Shows the philosophy of the gospel.(D. But as long as we live, failure is possible; there must be the possibility of ultimate failure, even on the part of the gray-haired saint, as Bunyan in his "dream" saw that "there was a way to hell from the gates of heaven as well as from the city of destruction"; as, before now, men have fallen from God at their very "lust hour." Before love can reign sole monarch in the soul, the "old man" must be destroyed.3. If I go to Jesus Christ as a sinful man, and get His love bestowed upon me, then, as the next verse to my text says, my love springs in response to His to me, and in the measure in which that love rises in my heart will it frustrate its antagonistic dread. )Links1 John 4:18 NIV1 John 4:18 NLT1 John 4:18 ESV1 John 4:18 NASB1 John 4:18 KJV1 John 4:18 Bible Apps1 John 4:18 Parallel1 John 4:18 Biblia Paralela1 John 4:18 Chinese Bible1 John 4:18 French Bible1 John 4:18 German Bible1 John 4:18 CommentariesBible Hub, (2)Our ghostly enemy;(3)Everlasting death.2. Love is like fire, but pure love is like the same fire free from all smoke and soot. A SOUL-TORMENTING FEAR.1. Fill the heart with love, and there is an end to the dominion of fear! A settled confidence in God's fatherly regard for us.3. It regards God not as the all holy and all-good Father, who has every right to filial obedience, but as an irresistible Power, not to be trifled with or escaped from, who can and will inflict tremendous penalties on those who venture to defy His authority. )Perfect loveSamuel Dunn.I. Hence the prospect of the day of judgment may well awaken our fear. (Samuel Dunn. )FearDean Alford.by anticipating punishment has it even now. These two are mutually exclusive.I. There are many professing Christian people who live all their days with a burden of shivering dread upon their shoulders and an icy cold fear in their hearts, just because they have not got close enough to Jesus Christ, and kept their hearts with sufficient steadfastness under the quickening influences of His love, to have shaken off their dread as a sick man's distempered fancies. He has been saying that perfect love produces courage in the day of judgment, because it produces likeness to Christ, who is the judge. The influential dwelling of God within us.4. Fear hath punishmentCambridge Bible for Schools.(R.V. (b)A cautionary fear of the holiness, justice, and power of God. Fear of punishment, either as imminent or as distant, is not a false or bad principle of action in its own place and for its own time. But just as when you pour pure water into a bladder, the poisonous gases that it may have contained will be driven out before it, so when love comes in dread goes out. (2)By transforming us into God's image. Therefore there lies, dormant for the most part, but present in every heart, and active in the measure in which that heart is informed as to itself, the slumbering cold dread that between it and God things are not as they ought to be. The extinction by God of all selfishness within us.Conclusion: This subject —. And in the Christian life they are united with terrible frequency. "Love" here is not merely our love to God, or our love to our neighbour, but the principle of love, or, as Ebrard expresses it, "the love which subsists between God and us; thus that simple relation of love of which the apostle had spoken in verse 12, and just now again in verse 16." But as long as we live, failure is possible; there must be the possibility of ultimate failure, even on the part of the gray-haired saint, as Bunyan in his "dream" saw that "there was a way to hell from the gates of heaven as well as from the city of destruction"; as, before now, men have fallen from God at their very "lust hour." Fear hath punishmentCambridge Bible for Schools.(R.V. (1) Not —(a)A reverential fear of God. Untamable God . Bishop Andrewes, alluding to it, observes that it is "as the base court to the temple," and adds that a man must do his duty "for fear of punishment, if he cannot get himself to do it for love of righteousness." He that loves has the whole Godhead for him. Take A Far And Close Look At The Baby In The Manger Contributed by Joel Pankow on Dec 24, 2020 | 1,125 views. But as long as we live, failure is possible; there must be the possibility of ultimate failure, even on the part of the gray-haired saint, as Bunyan in his "dream" saw that "there was a way to hell from the gates of heaven as well as from the city of destruction"; as, before now, men have fallen from God at their very "lust hour." "God is love; and he that abideth in love abideth in God, and God abideth in him;" and in a measure he is like unto God. And in the Christian life they are united with terrible frequency. Thomas, D. D.)Fear and loveW. And we learnt in chapter 2 that a group has splintered off from the church he’s writing to. Bishop Andrewes, alluding to it, observes that it is "as the base court to the temple," and adds that a man must do his duty "for fear of punishment, if he cannot get himself to do it for love of righteousness." All the attributes of God come to be on our side. Then there rises up another object of dread, which, in like manner, derives all its power to terrify and to hurt from the fact of our discordance with God, and that is, the "shadow feared of man," that stands shrouded by the path, and waits for each of us. No, rather into a fear which is so absolutely compatible with love that it may even be said to grow out of love, to be contained in love's very heart. But just as when you pour pure water into a bladder, the poisonous gases that it may have contained will be driven out before it, so when love comes in dread goes out. All men everywhere have some more or less faint or clear conviction of the existence of a God. Whilst all things serve the soul that serves Him, all are embattled against the man that is against, or not for, God and His will. Fear is entirely based on a consideration of some possible personal evil consequence coming down upon me from that clear sky above me. Well-formed love banishes fear. do not tamper with the wholesome sense of dread. Into such a love for God as excludes all fear whatsoever? And yet Scripture assigns to fear a considerable place in the apparatus, so to speak, of religious motives and forces (Luke 12:5; 2 Corinthians 5:10, 11; Philippians 2:12, 13; 1 Peter 1:17). "Work out your own salvation," is the apostle's teaching, "with fear and trembling." And that is true about hosts of us. 6. He that is trembling lest the lightning should strike him, has no heart to feel the grandeur and to be moved by the solemn awfulness of the storm above his head. But perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. Bright, D. D.)Fear has many eyes. Let the dread direct me to its source — my own sinfulness. Let the dread direct me to its source — my own sinfulness. Inconsistent as the two emotions are in themselves, in practice, they may be united by reason of the imperfection of the nobler. The intention of fear is to lead to that which shall annihilate it, and take away its cause. The evidence for the coming of such a day is various and strong. Let the discovery of my own sinfulness direct me to its remedy — the righteousness and the Cross of Jesus Christ. And when we rise to the highest form of it, namely, the love which is fixed upon God — oh! And these will, by degrees, absorb the fear of punishment, simply as such — into what? This includes —1. Watson. (b)Fear of meeting the necessaries of life. For there is another way in which love produces boldness, and that is by its casting out fear. Bright, D. D.)Fear has many eyes. I think we shall scarcely understand the religion of love unless we recognise that dread is a legitimate part of an unforgiven man's attitude towards God. Of course, he is speaking about the emotions which men cherish with regard to God. But remember that it is "perfect love" which "casts out fear." Watson. Distrust is the offspring of suspicion, and want of confidence is want of love. The brain is often bribed by the conscience, and the wish becomes the father of the thought. Thomas, D. D.)Fear and loveW. Oh! But that humble, filial reverence, which never forgets or slights the distance between the Creator and the creature which exercises itself day by day "to have always a conscience void of offence both toward God and toward man" — this is a Christian grace: if there be yet one higher, it must be sought, not in the abandonment, but in the strengthening of this. No, rather into a fear which is so absolutely compatible with love that it may even be said to grow out of love, to be contained in love's very heart. These two are mutually exclusive.I. The one who fears has not been perfected in love. )Perfect loveSamuel Dunn.I. And many people follow his example; they seem to know nothing of God's love; they spend their lives deprecating God's wrath. Love is like light, but simple and perfect love is like the same light freed from all cloud, and fog, and smoke.(G. I think we shall scarcely understand the religion of love unless we recognise that dread is a legitimate part of an unforgiven man's attitude towards God. And a man to whom the whole thought, or the predominant thought, when God rises before him, is, How awful will be the incidence of His perfections on my head! Maclaren, D. D.)Love and fearJ. Arising from that discomforting consciousness of discord there come, likewise, other forms and objects of dread. Love is no weak thing, no mere sentiment. Is not this "fear" worth something? No doubt there is real honest unbelief — a failing to believe — inability to find truth. This is the fear which, he says, "hath torment," or rather "punishment"; it carries punishment in its bosom. He has been saying that perfect love produces courage in the day of judgment, because it produces likeness to Christ, who is the judge. All the attributes of God come to be on our side. This includes —1. A slavish fear of —(1)Poverty.(2)Death.(3)Retribution.(4)God.2. THAT A GREAT DAY OF JUDGMENT AWAITS US IN THE FUTURE. (with 2 Timothy 1:7; Romans 8:15; John 14:27): — I have brought together several passages to show that the spirit of the gospel is not a spirit of fear, and that Jesus came to deliver us from all fear. As long as men dreaded nature they made no progress in knowledge or power. There are plenty of people who call themselves Christians whose whole religion consists in deprecating the wrath of God, whom they dimly think of as angry with them, and who, their consciences tell them, might well be so! This slavish fear is co extensive with the unregenerate race. A SOUL-TORMENTING FEAR.1. The work of Christ is to deliver us from all excessive fear, and to leave in its place calmness and sober watchfulness and a profound peace. D. Watson.Love is like honey, but perfect love is like the honey with all the comb and wax strained out. Distrust is the offspring of suspicion, and want of confidence is want of love. A consciousness that God loves us.2. It makes the present miserable by its horrid forebodings of the future.II.